J - Joseph's Star

  

The Joseph’s Star was created by Christina R. Jussaume in 2007, in memory of her father. 

 7 lines

1/3/5/7/7/5/1

Unrhymed

Any subject, and no limit to the number of stanzas, but each should be a complete statement.

Center aligned 


I wrote three Joseph's Stars.  

 

Seed.

With much hope

I plant you, having

such weighty expectations

from such a little beadlet

of potential life.

Grow!

 

lavender seed ©2020 L.S.Nelson

Come.

Stop in soon

and stay for tea and

spice bread warm from the oven.

We will talk of the neighbors

with curtains drawn tight.

Come.

 

Chores.

Remember

how it was when we

ironed all the clothes each week?

Always a Tuesday it was,

after Monday’s wash.

Rote.


©2021 Lisa Smith Nelson. All Rights Reserved

Comments

  1. Wow! What a fantastic form. I can't wait to write some Joseph's Star myself. Thank you!

    Suzanna from Operation Awesome
    https://operationawesome6.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I enjoyed the form. I liked that it didn't keep to the expected 1/3/5/7/7/5/3/1, but skipped to 1 after the second 5 syllables.

      Delete
  2. What a beautiful tribute to a father. But this made me think: how does one "invent" a modern poetry form? Just... starts writing it? Or is there an announcement?...

    The Multicolored Diary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wondered the same, as well as why newer forms are "invented," when all forms were invented at one time or another! Maybe just naming a form and having a following that accepts you invented it? There is one, I am not sure if I have posted it yet, or it's coming up, where it's just syllables 1/2/3. Why that wasn't named centuries ago? But, it's a "new" form. Poets obviously used the 1/2/3 form, but there was no name for it. There we go... name a form without a name!

      Delete

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