Untitled Golden Shovel

 Writers' Pantry #52

 https://poetsandstorytellersunited.blogspot.com/2021/01/writers-pantry-52-years-beginning.html

I've been playing with some new, to me, poetry forms.  April is the Blogging from A to Z Challenge, and my plans are A-Z of poetry forms.  I like to get a head start, especially since I also participate on my other blog.  

This is a Golden Shovel. It was created by Terrance Hayes, an award-winning poet and professor in New York.  https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/terrance-hayes

The "rules" are:

  • take lines, or one line, from an existing poem
  • take each word and use it, in order, as an end word in your new poem
  • give credit

My poem uses the words from the last line of Edna St. Vincent Millay's Time Does Not Bring Relief (Sonnet II),

"and so stand stricken so remembering him."

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had told him “yes” already, and

it’s too late to change that now, so

I let my words stand

though I am stricken

at the thought.  I am so

cruel, remembering

I had never loved him.

 

 ©2021 Lisa Smith Nelson. All Rights Reserved

  


 

Comments

  1. That just spun the line in a different direction and still kept a sadness.

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    Replies
    1. I think you're right, still sad, in a different way.

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  2. I have a feeling that many of us know what it is to pretend to love...

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    Replies
    1. Probably so. It's just so sad though. We only get one life, we should be happier than that.

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  3. A great example of the golden shovel! Well done.

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    Replies
    1. So happy to hear you say so! I had never heard of them until I looked for forms starting with G.

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  4. Replies
    1. Thanks. The ending words definitely came from a great poem by a great poet.

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  5. Well done You wove that into a great poem Very creative

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  6. This say so much with so few words--really well done!

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  7. Thanks for reminding me of the golden shovel form. You've done it beautifully!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for saying so! That means a lot.

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  8. Great use of the form....must give this a shot. Looks challenging
    Interesting poem...

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    Replies
    1. I think it is challenging or not depending on what words you use. I didn't find this one particularly so. Maybe it was beginners luck picking the right line.

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  9. I've never tried a golden shovel, but its there, somewhere, on my list, if only I can find the line I want to use. Ever try a Sevenling? I highly recommend. Check it out here https://poetscollective.org/poetryforms/sevenling/
    And I post them often on my blog. Here's just one: https://rlavalette.wordpress.com/2021/01/07/after-the-genie/

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    Replies
    1. I have not, no. I'll have to give it a try. I do like yours!

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  10. it's not easy, and you have done it so effortlessly.
    such seamless movement, won't know it's a golden shovel if it is not mentioned. :)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! I happened to use just the right line with just the right words to make my first one easy I think!

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  11. This makes me want to try a golden shovel poem. :)

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    Replies
    1. Do! I enjoy using lines or words and see what comes out. Like prompts, so many different poems result from everyone.

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  12. Sadly if she never loved him it is the narrator that will be hurt the most in the future.

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    1. That's true, especially if she finds he felt the same all along! At least she doesn't try to justify it someway, she knows it's "cruel." To both, yes. Robs her of a happy relationship.

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  13. That's an intriguing story in a tiny space. I have to wonder what comes next for them both.

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