The Moons of Autumn: A Wordcraft Journal of Syllabic Verse

The Moons of Autumn: Word Weaving #1, A Wordcraft Journal of Syllabic Verse, a collection of syllabic poetry, edited by Colleen M. Chesebro & JulesPaige, is now available in print and for Kindle

 
I am thrilled and honored to have two of my haiku (3-5-3) included in this collection celebrating the Moons of Autumn.  Colleen sponsors the weekly poetry challenge, Tanka Tuesday.  This week is Poet's Choice, so I am sharing the two haiku from the book for that, as well as for Writers' Pantry #91.


moonlight flows

howl all wild beings

to Nanna

 

Falling Leaf

or Winterfylleth 

the veil thins 

©2021 Lisa Smith Nelson. All Rights Reserved 

Nanna is the Norse goddess associated with the moon.  It is also the name of the Mesopotamian god of the moon, however, I am referring to the goddess in the poem. 

Falling Leaf Moon is another name for the Blood Moon in October.  

Winterfylleth is the Old English name for October.  

 



Comments

  1. I loved your haiku, and the background notes.

    Congratulations! The book sounds enticing, and I'll be grabbing it as soon as it comes out on Kindle.

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    1. Thank you. :) The Kindle is available from the Kindle link above. Print and digital have two different links.

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  2. What a glorious tribute to Word Weaving. We enjoyed your poetry! Thanks so much for being part of this journey. <3

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    1. Thank you so much for including me! It's very exciting to be published for the first time!

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  3. Such a little poem that teaches much! I now know more about Norse goddesses, the Blood Moon, and the old English name for October...and I'm so happy they changed it, winterfylleth is impossible to spell!!

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    1. It is a bit much! It's fun to learn about origins and myths, at least I find it so.

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  4. These are beautiful, Lisa! The first one sings (and howls) right into my soul. Nanna (from Mesopotamian mythology) is a god I've always felt rather strongly about. I know you're referring to the Norse goddess in this one. Still, it's good to see Nanna inked your poetry.

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    1. Thank you so much. We could howl to either or both Nannas! Mythology is so fascinating. Roman and Greek get all the publicity!

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  5. Your haiku are lovely ... congratulations!!!!

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  6. What gorgeous words for moons and diety.
    Congratulations

    Muchđź’ślove

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    1. Thank you very much! There are such pretty names for the moons, old ones. And the deities are fascinating to me.

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